Guiding Principles

The vision of excellence in assessment practices in Perry Local Schools is grounded upon the following guiding principles:

I.  STUDENTS ARE THE KEY ASSESSMENT USERS

▪      Students are informed regularly about targets in terms they can understand, in part through the study of criteria by which their work will be evaluated and samples of high quality work.

▪      Students can describe what targets they are to hit and what comes next in their learning.

▪      Classroom assessment information is used by students to revise and guide learning.

▪      Students are actively, consistently, and effectively involved in the assessment process.

▪      Students know how to plan and improve through use of assessments and their results.

▪      Students learn to manage their own learning through the skills of self-assessment (metacognition).

▪      Students are empowered and therefore motivated because of their active involvement in assessment.

II.  CLEAR AND APPROPRIATE TARGETS ARE ESSENTIAL

▪      Teachers understand and can articulate in advance of teaching the achievement targets students are to hit.

▪      Students are informed regularly about those targets in terms they can understand, in part through the study of criteria by which their work will be evaluated and samples of high quality work.

▪      Students can describe what targets they are to hit and what comes next in their learning

▪      The targets show students what it means to do well and to succeed academically.

▪      Clear targets set limits and set teachers and schools up for success by defining responsibilities.

III. ACCURATE ASSESSMENT IS A MUST

§         Accurate assessments the 5 standards of:

–    clear targets

–    focused purpose

–    proper method

–    offering a representative sample of the learning targets

–    free from bias and distortion

▪     The assessor and learner will provide a clear and appropriate description  of the specific achievement expectation(s) that it is designed to reflect.

▪     The assessor and the learner both understand the purpose or the assessment.

▪    The assessor matches the best method of assessment to the given target.

▪    The assessor insures that the assessment reflects an accurate sample of the learning targets (number of: topic, words to use, vocabulary).

▪    The assessor eliminates errors of measure due to bias and distortion to maximize the reliability of the assessment (i.e., gender bias, weighting question/answer points).

▪    Giving the test in the same conditions, time to the learners.

IV. SOUND ASSESSMENTS MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY EFFECTIVE  COMMUNICATION

▪    Students are informed regularly about targets in terms they can understand, in part through the study of criteria by which their work will be evaluated and samples of high quality work.

▪    Students can describe what targets they are to hit and what comes next in their learning.

▪    Feedback given to students is descriptive, constructive, frequent, and immediate, helping students to know how to plan and improve.

▪    Students actively, consistently, and effectively communicate with others about their achievement status and improvement.

Educators need to. . .

▪    Help our communities understand the differences between sound and unsound assessment practices.

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